Kisanandshashant

Kisan and Shasant can enjoy cricket again

March 2019

Brothers Kisan, 12, and Shashant, 10, were both struggling with short-sightedness so severe that, according to one senior optometrist, the World Health Organisation would classify them blind. After an Orbis-funded programme revealed they had high myopia, the boys were prescribed glasses - and now life has improved dramatically.

When we first meet Kisan and Shashant at their family home, both of them initially appear to be quite shy. Following a quick game of cricket with their friends in a field behind their family home, the boys seem to come out of their shells up and happily sit down to talk to us.

Their bond is quite evident. They also seem to be close to their older sister, Juli, who hovers watchfully in the background. Kisan generally takes the lead in responding to us, with Shashant following suit and occasionally looking to him for guidance.

Before, when I played cricket, when they throw the ball towards me, I could not see it. The ball would pass near me but I could not see and my friends used to tease me for this.

Kisan

age 12

Kisancricket

With his new glasses, Kisan can enjoy playing cricket with his brother and their friends

The brothers tell us a little bit about their family and about their hobbies which include playing cricket and playing card games. We comment on their cool glasses. Kisan tells us “I like the colour, which is why I chose these.”

They go on to tell us about some of the challenges that they encountered before they started wearing glasses. “I cannot read the whiteboard or blackboard. I cannot see objects at a far distance and I cannot read properly,” Kisan tells us. Shashant continues, telling us that he too struggled to see objects at a distance. He adds, “when my mother says to bring me something, I cannot bring it.”

Shashant from Nepal writes on the whiteboard

Now, Shashant and his brother can both see the whiteboard, whatever the distance

When asked what difference they feel wearing glasses has made to them, both boys seem visibly relieved. Kisan tells us: “all the difficulties I had before like reading, playing with my mother, these are no longer difficulties. I can see anything, I can see things which are at a far distance,” while Shasant says, “I can also see objects clearly, and I can read properly with my glasses.”

When the boys are asked what they would like to say to the team that ensured they got their glasses, both respond with enthusiasm. Kisan says: “to all the sisters, uncles, who have given me the glasses, I want to say thank you.”

Kisan and Shashant’s English teacher has noticed a marked improvement in both the boys after they received their glasses. And their education will be important for the boys to fulfil their dreams - Kisan wants to be a scientist while Shashant hopes to become a doctor.

I was not able to look at the board at school and I am thankful for being given glasses so now I can see.

Shashant

age 10

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